Free Culture [en]

The Secret Government Rulebook For Labeling You a Terrorist

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 16:55
Advocatus Diaboli sends this report: The Obama administration has quietly approved a substantial expansion of the terrorist watchlist system, authorizing a secret process that requires neither "concrete facts" nor "irrefutable evidence" to designate an American or foreigner as a terrorist, according to a key government document obtained by The Intercept. ...The heart of the document revolves around the rules for placing individuals on a watchlist. "All executive departments and agencies," the document says, are responsible for collecting and sharing information on terrorist suspects with the National Counterterrorism Center. It sets a low standard—"reasonable suspicion"—for placing names on the watchlists, and offers a multitude of vague, confusing, or contradictory instructions for gauging it. In the chapter on "Minimum Substantive Derogatory Criteria"—even the title is hard to digest—the key sentence on reasonable suspicion offers little clarity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 14:07
blottsie writes: Out of all the U.S. government agencies, the Department of Homeland Security is one of the least transparent. As such, the number of Freedom of Information Act requests it receives have doubled since 2008. But the DHS has only become more adamant about blocking FOIA requests over the years. The problem has become so severe that nothing short of an Edward Snowden-style leak may be needed to increase transparency at the DHS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Open Badges blog: Bernard Bull | 5 Predictions About Educational Credentialing in 2024

Planet Drumbeat - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:48

Dr. Bernard Bull, who led the Beyond Letter Grades MOOC, is currently designing a set of graduate courses around badges and writes about credentialing, assessment, and the future of education and learning on his blog, Etale. In a recent blog post, Dr. Bull made 5 predictions about the educational credentialing landscape in 2024 - have a look at them below.

Read the full post here.

**********************************************************************************

1. Unbundled Education – Education will become increasingly unbundled and aggregated across networks and contexts. This will give way to increased grass-roots educational initiatives, the capacity for learners to self-blend learning experiences from multiple sources and organizations, and cross-organizational credentials. Highly regulated sectors and those with strong centralized professional organizations and standards will be most insulated from some of this. It will lead to significant turmoil and disruption in many higher education institutions.

2. Networked Learning will become a fundamental life and work skill. While the most regulated industries will be more insulated, there will be significant conflict between democratizing and authoritarian models of education and training. Regardless, a fundamental aspect of lifelong learning will be the development, maintenance and ongoing expansion of a personal learning network. Related to this, we will see massive formal learning networks within geographic areas, specific fields and professions, and other distinct physical or virtual communities.

3. For many professions and trades, competency-based education and assessment will largely replace assessment of readiness through traditional letter grade systems, GPAs and similar measures. Systems like traditional letter grades will be phased out with the emergence of more accurate and granular measures of learner progress and competence. This will impact both initial training and continuing education.

4. Depending upon the context, alternate and micro-credentialing systems will replace or supplement letter grades, course, credits, and degrees (but the most regulated industries will be more insulated from this disruption). These emerging credentialing systems will have features like expiration dates and detailed information about the criteria met to earn the credential.

5. Educational experiences will provide significant learner control and/or learner-specific adjustments of time, place, pace and learning pathway. As part of this, adaptive learning and robust learning progression designs will replace many industrial or one-size-fits all models of education and training. For better or worse, with the maturity of adaptive learning tools, there will be a renewed and invigorated battle between the  “science of teaching and learning” and the “art of teaching and learning.” Learning analytics and big data will drive the design of high-impact, competency-based individualized learning experiences.

Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Text of the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement

Infojustice - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:40
Readers of this blog may be interested in checking out the text of the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement, which was signed on July 8.  The intellectual property chapter contains many of the copyright, trademark, and enforcement provisions under debate in the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations.  It also contains provisions on plant varieties and geographical indications.  [...]
Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot YourRightsOnline - 23 Julio, 2014 - 11:35
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categorías: Free Culture [en]
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